Phil Harper

Phil Harper

Tuesday, 16 September 2014 10:04

How's Your Dark Side?

Nordic Noir is a recent phenomenon – The Killing, Borgen and, my fave, The Bridge – are TV crime series that show gruesome killings and the dark underbelly of Scandinavian life. It’s a bit ironic since the UN considers Denmark to be ‘the happiest country to live in’. Now I am no Scandinavian expert – I cycled round a section of Denmark this summer and I have watched a few things on the TV. But it’s worth considering why the Dark Side is so vividly explored, exposed and popular in these series.

Soren Malling, actor in The Killing, said "maybe it’s because we are comfortable with exploring our dark side that it makes us happier - we see ourselves as we really are and we are not so hard on ourselves and each other." Some of us in the UK suffer from pointing out the criminals and attempting to punish as harshly as we can, in the mistaken belief that punishment will satisfy and restore us.

There were some uncomfortable studies done at the time of the tragic death of Jamie Bulger in the early 90s and the trial of those who caused his death – the boys were not yet teenagers. The research compared the UK response to this crime and the Norwegian reaction to a similar crime in their country. It showed that our punitive and judgmental response was in sharp contrast to an enlightened Norwegian society that upheld the status of the criminals as children and they should be given anonymity and an opportunity to continue their lives away from the prison system.

http://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/2010/mar/20/norway-town-forgave-child-killers

Jesus said to his friends to deal with the whacking great plank in their own eyes before they pointed out the miniscule splinter in someone else’s. Let’s not be hard on others and give a little bit of attention to our own selfishness. Then, instead of being hard on ourselves, let’s allow God to show what grace, mercy and forgiveness is all about – we might be pleasantly surprised and amazed.

Monday, 04 August 2014 10:25

What's the plan?

I’m just back from a wedding celebration that had a wedding planner – when I got married I think that was my mum’s job! Having someone who knows what’s happening is especially helpful for a wedding celebration -someone who knows what’s important and what needs to take place next.

For a longer term project, e.g. training for a triathlon, there needs to be a different plan. A triathlon can’t be done by someone else who is planning every detail. There needs to be a lot of self-motivation and self-discipline.

Recently I took part in a triathlon relay – 3 events completed by 3 people – I did the cycling leg. The distance was further than I normally do – I am used to 8 miles in the morning and 8 miles in the afternoon. Anything further than that, I lose energy and pace.

So I decided to aim for the 20 miles. To get there at any pace I would need a new plan. It turned out I had to change a lot of what I currently did. I had more rest days. I stretched out my morning ride – this meant getting up at silly o’clock and cycling for longer. All that required a chunk of self-motivation and self-discipline.

A colleague of mine said to me in the middle of this new training regime, when I was whinging about my ‘8 mile legs’, ‘you are what you train for’. He was reminding me that I had 8 mile legs because that’s all they were used to and if I wanted 20 mile legs, I had to train for that.

His comment was incredibly encouraging. I felt more determined and hopeful. But it also raised some questions for me – What am I training for in my life? What am I working towards? What am I motivated for? What am I disciplining myself towards?

Maybe it will mean I put a training plan together for my life that expects sacrifice, forgiveness, grace, perseverance, joy and suffering and ends up with me achieving my goal – to be a follower of Jesus.

Wednesday, 18 June 2014 09:52

Where was humanity?

Auschwitz

Going to a death camp in Poland isn’t everyone’s idea of a pleasant day out – and it isn’t. Yet I went with 200 teachers from across the country to visit Auschwitz to deepen my understanding of the Holocaust.

Most people told me they either went and it was incredibly moving, have put it on a ‘bucket list’ of places to go at some point or could not bear to go. 

For me it was one of the most significant places I have ever visited. This was down to a number of factors. Firstly, the Polish tour guide - a woman who takes one or two groups a day. She was full of empathy, compassion and integrity. Secondly, our group leaders, who shared stories of people who were perpetrators or victims. They provoked, moved and inspired me. Thirdly, the place – it overpowered me and saddened me with its history.

However, nothing prepared me for the time of reflection at the end of the day. I can’t paint pictures with words but let me list the ingredients – sitting with 200 on the side of the national memorial at the top end of Auschwitz, the sun was setting through the tall birch trees, all the birds were singing, someone read Psalm 23. Then a rabbi stood up and read a prayer in Hebrew, blew the shofar, led us in a minute’s silence and then shared about the complexity of good people suffering.

 I will never forget what the rabbi said; "Some people, when faced with the horror of the Holocaust, cry out 'Where was God?' but I cry out 'Where was humanity?'"

But Jesus encourages us "to treat others as we would like to be treated" – I can positively change your world with love. So I intend to respond positively to the call from God, "Who shall I send?" with a "Here I am, send me".

Tuesday, 25 March 2014 14:44

Phil Blog: Multiplication

Multiply or Divide?

Take 1 thing and change it into 2 things and you would normally refer to that as division. However looking at our bodies, we would refer to that as multiplication of cells from conception all the way through our lives.

At this point I will leave the ‘science bit’ to those more qualified. What I observe is that any species in the biological world that doesn't give birth to a new generation dies. This is true in the biological world as well as in the small-group world. Groups that don't multiply die or become stagnant.

This week I was preparing to start a conversation with one of our Cell Groups about multiplying and I reflected on one of my own regular questions as an overseer of Cell Groups at Revelation, ‘why do people in Revelation not embrace change/multiplication? – we are supposed to be radical, pioneering, etc’.

As I prayed I got a bit of insight. Many of us have families that live a long distance away so our instinctive experience of ‘family’ has been removed from us. This can mean that we invest a lot of emotional energy into a Cell Group as we see it as a ‘family’ – for some this will be traumatic if the Cell Group is multiplied. 

What do I do with that insight? Do I give up on the idea of growing and multiplying? Do I wait til ‘reluctant multipliers’ see things from my perspective?

Well today my response is to remain focused on growth. However I sense a compassion for those who really struggle and maybe we can discover grace and faith as we create open, generous, safe and liberating communities. 

What’s your insight on this? 

Phil